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BNC TV interview with Johnwick Nathan

Updated: Jul 20




BNC:


As South Africa pulls together to restore calm, there are many who are left with the emotional trauma of losing loved ones or a business in the aftermath. Scenes like this play out every day. And this type of trauma can also impact a person's mental health. And joining us now is Johnwick Nathan, CEO of Harbor Health Integrated care. Johnwick, good evening, and welcome to BNC.


Johnwick Nathan:


Thank you so much. It's a pleasure.


BNC:


Johnwick, as we talk about the unrest the people of South Africa are going through right now, tell us how this type of trauma can actually impact one's mental health.


Johnwick Nathan:


I do believe that experience really dictates the way we behave in our future. And so what I've observed and also notice with individuals who are in that area is that there's no help. There's no guidance. There is no assistance in any way, shape or form. The government does try their best to, I would assume, try their best to actually help them. However, they oftentimes run into challenges of dealing with finances, or the hospitals are simply unable to actually meet the needs of the people.


BNC:


And so, you know, people tend to think they don't need help. And if they seek therapy, there's a look at, as you know, we're crazy, right? Why did you feel the need to bring mental health clinics to Ghana?


Johnwick Nathan:


I found it very, very important for mental health to be, primarily, the awareness of mental health. Right? And so when I went to Ghana for the first time, I initially observed one. I met with some of the directors of the mental health hospitals and met with the educational directors. Really to simply bring that awareness of what made it better important. Everyone around the world is well aware of the fact that Africa in general are literally, some places, actually are centuries behind. And so how do you take someone who still operates in the 17th, 18th century, right? And try to bring them up to par? And so the success I have experienced here in Arizona, I want to see down in Ghana, because the thing is they deserve the same help as well.


Johnwick Nathan:


I specialize in native Americans, and so native Americans that have, I would say a lifestyle, certain people, not everyone, have a lifestyle that's generations behind as far as how modern our world is. And I imagine a place that does not receive help such as native Americans, whoever, who receive help from from the U S government. Imagine a place that does not receive help at all. And so you find these people who are out in the streets, you find these people who are in the hospitals. I went to this one location in Ghana, Pantang Hospital. And just to even see their mental health department, it was unreal. There was no seating. The beds that they were staying in wasn't good. Some people actually have to be chained up. That's huge. I don't chain my people up, they stay in the bedrooms. And so if we could find a way to actually properly provide treatment to these individuals, I believe that we can expense a major success in Ghana.


BNC:


Yeah, I mean, and what you said is so powerful to see people chained up, and how does it mentally chain up your mind when you're experiencing something like that?


Johnwick Nathan:


Well, number one, first of all, we're not animals. No one is treated as animals. And it's not the fact that they're treating them like animals. Cause the thing is you have to understand people's mindset. You know, behind this thing, this is just what they've experienced and this is just what they’ve been taught to do, And so without proper guidance, without proper, medical advice, without proper education – which is why I went to the educational department, because I believe that if we can somehow empower our people to learn, right? They can then turn around and go back into the communities and make the change, but someone has to do it. And so I believe seeing someone chained up, or maybe the person being chained up, they may not even understand why they’re chained up, or it just may make them feel crazy. I think it disrupts the mind, it disrupts the spirit. Imagine a family member going in there and seeing the person like that. It can even damage them because again, like I said earlier, a person's mental health is often affected or even created by experience, it’s created by trauma, that's a traumatic experience right there.


BNC:


Yeah, .And so, talk about the work that you're doing, about the new clinics you're opening up in Ghana, and are there plans to expand in other regions


Johnwick Nathan:


As of right now, I'm just staying in the Southern part of Ghana. I'm not sure if my PR team mentioned, I've recently been ordained a King in the Southern part of Ghana over the ??? people. A legitimate rule is for a foreigner to come in and actually lead a group of people. And so I kind of have to stay in that area for now. And so my focus primarily in the Nangua community. The Ga people make up the greater part of Accra which is roughly around 2 million people. And so right now I have to simply just focus on just them, and see how it is, see what their needs are. I'm actually going on Monday, see what their needs are, see how it is that I can actually help them. The clinics that will be opening up will purposely be built to meet the need of the people. Not what I think is nice and classy, and clean. No, what are the needs of people? And those are the steps that we're going to provide. And as the needs grow, we build.


BNC:


That is very, very important. King Johnwick, as they call you there in Ghana, We're so excited about the work that you're doing, because we know a lot of those people need your help there. So thank you so much for the work that you are doing over there, and we appreciate your time.


Johnwick Nathan:


Thank you so much. I appreciate you guys.




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